top of page

When I try new things I'm feeling what it's like to be in and out of control. That way I begin to understand the difference.

child-410079.jpg

What Real Learning Looks Like

...and it doesn't looks like learning.

Reading

We don't think about it, but reading is physical. That means the muscles in the eyes need to be fit for reading just as much as the muscles in the legs need to be ready for running.

 

Playing games where your child watches and follows things that move slowly like bubbles, feathers and balloons strengthen eye muscles to make it easier to track words from one side of the page to the other. 

Self-Control

Physical and emotional self-control emerges over time from experiences that naturally expand their comfort zone. That's why its important to try to let them try, but of course, always be there for safety.

Self-Control

Compassion

Role-play is a child trying on empathy for size. By emulating their heroes they are learning how others do things, how they move, think, feel, and communicate.

Rev up your imagination and play along. It's their turn to be your hero.

Compassion

Concentration

Activities that help develop balance like hanging upside down also help the brain learn to focus and concentrate.​

Try to remember that kids often move in ways we don't understand because the brain is craving movement in order to refocus their attention. 

Concentration

Science

A leaf. A puddle. A toy. A sandwich. Mommy. Daddy. And frogs. Everything is part of their personal learning laboratory. 

Showing them a picture on a screen isn't enough. The brain needs more. The brain needs the body and the senses to make it real.

Reading

Puddle & Leaf - autumn-2917472.jpg

Science

Power

World-building gives children a sense of power and control to construct their vision of how things should be. When you're in their world, follow their rules as you expect them to follow yours.

Relationships

All throughout the early years, kids are learning how they fit into their world by testing their size and shape in different kinds of spaces. And believe it or not, their physical relationship to the world is one of the foundations they use to relate to others.

Courage

Taking on physical challenges gives them strength and stamina. But more, it gives them the courage to take on even more with joyful confidence.

If your child is timid, introduce something new by starting with something familiar. Encourage but don't push. You can always try again another day. For the bold and fearless type, stand nearby to help guide and support them.

happy-child-against-blue-sea-background-summer-vacation-kids-concept.jpg

Courage

Creativity

Complex, coordinated movement such as riding a bike signals the brain is beginning to work on all cylinders, enabling more sophisticated thinking, reasoning, creativity, and imagination. That's why a bike is a rocket ship one day, a jet ski the next. Imagination takes them everywhere!

close-up-child-rides-bicycle-with-three-wheels.jpg

Creativity

Judgment

Ball play is a great way to teach kids that the world is a dynamic place, full of unpredictability. And it's a great way to prepare essential cognitive abilities like anticipation and prediction. So go play ball! They love it. And they need it!

Judgment

Reasoning

Research shows that music in all its forms -- singing, dancing, playing instruments, and even just listening -- works to prepare the brain for critical thinking, reasoning, and problem solving. Introduce your child to all kinds of music. It's good for them. And be sure to invite them to dance with you!

Reasoning

Math

Moving the body is their first math lesson! For instance, crawling through a tunnel makes it easy to understand circles. Standing tall or crouching down small is the physical experience of more and less.

Knowing their numbers is great. But there's more to math than 1-10 and that's where play comes in. When your child is moving and playing, be sure to introduce math language such as big/small, more/less, high/low, and/or, etc.

Math

Handwriting

Handwriting takes more than just holding a pencil. Children need whole-body fitness and upper body strength to control the arm, wrist, hands, and fingers to write their name and so much more. That's why lots of whole-body, weight-bearing, and high-energy play is a great all-around foundation for getting ready to write. 

Spelling

Listening carefully helps children hear the differences and similarities between sounds. This is great prep work for learning to spell. Take a walk together. Stop and listen. Point to the sounds you hear and talk about what they might be. See if you can make the sounds you hear together.

Handwriting

Spelling

Responsibility

Nurturing play gives children a taste of what it's like to be in charge. It's a powerful feeling and they take pride in doing a good job. That's why they love to help us with our chores. Whenever you can, give them little jobs you know they can handle. Effort, enthusiasm, and stick-to-it-iveness are what matters, no matter the actual result.

african-american-girl.jpg

Responsibility

Trust

When they feel you will always have their back, you're showing them what friendship looks like.​

Rough 'n Tumble play builds trust and great memories for both of you. Of course, keep it gentle and always be guided by your child

Trust

Relationships

Power

Language

Every teacher will tell you kids need to be surrounded by rich, nutritious language. The more words the better. And that's great. But remember, there's more to language than just the words we speak. Kids read our body language and expressions. And they know when we're only half-listening. To engage them in conversation get eye to eye with them. Lean in. Actively listening to their stories, their ideas, their feelings. In showing them respect, they're learning how to give respect to others.

mother-with-son.jpg

Language

Love

Love is play. Especially with you.

Love

Compassion. Role-play is a child trying on empathy for size. By emulating their heroes they are learning how others do things... how they move, think, feel, and communicate. Rev up your imagination and play along. It's their turn to be your hero.

Concentration. Activities that help develop balance like hanging upside down also help the brain learn to focus and concentrate. Try to remember that kids move in ways we don't understand often because the brain is craving movement in order to refocus their attention. LEARN MORE... 

Courage. Taking on physical challenges gives them strength and stamina. But more, it gives them the courage to take on even more with joyful confidence. If your child is timid, introduce something new by stating with something familiar. Encourage but don't push. You can always try again another day. For the bold and fearless type, stand nearby to help guide and support them. LEARN MORE...

Creativity. Complex, coordinated movement such as riding a bike signals the brain is beginning to work on all cylinders, enabling more sophisticated thinking, reasoning, creativity, and imagination. That's why a bike is a rocket shop one day, a jet ski the next. Imagination takes them everywhere!

Handwriting. Handwriting takes more than just holding a pencil. Children need whole-body fitness and upper body strength to control the arm, wrist, hands, and fingers to write their name and so much more. That's why lots of whole-body, weight-bearing and high-energy play is a a great all-around foundation for getting ready to write. LEARN MORE...

Judgment. Ball play is a great way to teach kids that the world is a dynamic place, full of unpredictability. And it's a great way to prepare essential cognitive abilities like anticipation and prediction. So go play ball. They love it! And they need it!

Language. Every teacher will tell you kids need to be surrounded by rich, nutritious language. The more words the better. And that's great. But remember, there's more to language than just knowing the words. Kids read our body language and expressions. They know when we're listening and only half-listening. To engage them in conversation get eye to eye with them. Lean in. Actively listen to their stories, their ideas, their feelings. In showing them respect, they're learning how to give respect to others. LEARN MORE...

Love. Love is play. Especially with you.

Math. Moving the body is their first math lesson! For instance, crawling through a tunnel makes it easy to understand circles. Standing tall or crouching down small is the physical experience of more and less. Knowing their numbers is great. But there's more to math than 1-10 and that's where play comes in. When your child is moving and playing, be sure to introduce math language such as big/small, more/less, high/low, and/or, etc.

Power. World-building gives children a sense of power and control to construct their vision of how things should be. When you're in their world, follow their rules as you expect them to follow yours.

Reading. We don't think about it, but reading is physical. That means the muscles in the eyes need to be fit for reading just as much as the muscles in the legs need to be ready for running. Playing games where your child watches and follows things that move slowly like bubbles, feathers, and balloons strengthens eye muscles to make it easier to track words from one side of the page to the other.

Reasoning. Research shows that music in all its forms - singing, dancing, playing instruments, and even just listening - works to prepare the brain or critical thinking, reasoning, and problem-solving. Introduce your child to all kinds of music. It's good for them. And be sure to invite them to dance with you!

Relationships. All throughout the early years, kids are learning how they fit into their world by testing their size and shape in different kinds of spaces. And believe it or not, their physical relationship to the world is one of the foundations they use to relate to others. LEARN MORE...

Responsibility. Nurturing play gives children a taste of what it's like to be in charge. It's a powerful feeling and they take pride in doing a good job. That's why they love to help us with our chores. Whenever you can, give them little jobs you know they can handle. Effort, enthusiasm, and stick-to-it-iveness are what matters, no matter the actual result. LEARN MORE...

Science. A leaf. A puddle. A toy. A sandwich. Mommy. Daddy. And frogs. Everything is part of their personal learning laboratory. Showing them a picture on a screen isn't enough. The brain needs more. The brain needs the body and the senses to make it real. LEARN MORE...

Self-Control. Physical and emotional self-control emerges over time from experiences that naturally expand their comfort zone. That's why it's important to try to let them try, but of course, always be there for safety. LEARN MORE...

Spelling. Listening carefully helps children hear the differences and similarities between sounds. This is great prep world for learning to spell. Take a walk together. Stop and listen. Point to the sounds you hear and talk about what they might be. See if you can make the sounds you hear together.

Trust. When they feel you will always have their back, you're showing them what friendship looks like. Rough 'n Tumble play builds trust and great memories for both of you. Of course, keep it gentle and always be guided by your child.

bottom of page